Monday, May 9, 2016

Anonymous Takes 9 Central Banks Offline — Unleashes Massive Assault on ‘Global Banking Cartel’

by Jay Syrmopoulos , The Free Thought Project

After a global call to arms, the Anonymous campaign against the global banking industry, OpIcarus seems to be gaining major momentum, as eight more financial institutions have been taken down after the initial attack on the Central Bank of Greece – followed by a similar DDoS attack on the Central Bank of Cyprus.

According to a video released in conjunction with OpIcarus, the attack on Bank of Greece marked the beginning of a “30-day campaign against central bank sites across the world.” This massive push, according to the video, aims to “strike at the heart of [the] empire by once again throw[ing] a wrench into the machine.”

In some of the most recent attacks over the weekend, hackers reportedly targeted the Central Bank of the Dominican Republic, the Dutch Central Bank, the Central Bank of Maldives, and Guernsey Financial Services Commission, according to the official @OpIcarus Twitter account.

The National Bank of Panama and the Central Bank of Kenya were also reportedly targeted a day later, according to hacking news publication HackRead.

What began as an Anonymous operation has now become a joint op between Anonymous and the GhostSquadHackers, with reported GSH member, s1ege tweeting about taking the Central Bank of Bosnia-Herzegovina offline and providing a screenshot to verify.

The twitter account @BannedOffline also reported the Central Bank of Mexico had succumbed to a DDoS attack by the hacking collective.

Anonymous has released a list of institutions the collective plans to target, which is divided into four sections; websites associated with the U.S. Federal Reserve, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), sites owned by the World Bank, and over 150 sites associated with national banks around the globe.
Thus far, in less than a week, OpIcarus hackers have now hit ten of the financial institutions they’ve listed in an online manifesto, but questions remain as to whether these elite hackers will be able to bypass the intense security measures of the more prestigious institutions on their target list.