Friday, July 15, 2016

Congress Finally Releases the Secret 28 Pages - Declassified 9/11 pages show ties to former Saudi ambassador to USA

Uploaded the declassified 9/11 '28' pages to my Scribd account  for your convenience....

Congress releases long-secret '28 pages' indicating Saudi ties to 9/11

The long-awaited 28 pages of a 2002 congressional report on the 9/11 have been released, and a section indicates that prominent members of the Saudi Arabian government were involved in planning and financing the terror attacks.
The declassified documents were released by Congress on Friday and released them the same day, release of the documents confirmed suspicions that the terrorists involved in the 9/11 attacks – most of whom were Saudi nationals –  likely received support from high-ranking Saudi intelligence officers.

“While in the United States, some of the September 11 hijackers were in contact with, and received support or assistance from, individuals who may have be connected to the Saudi Government,” the report states. “There is information, primarily from FBI sources, that at least two of those individuals were alleged by some to be Saudi intelligence officers.”

However, the report states that the precise extent of the suspected involvement of the Saudi officials isn’t clear.

“In their testimony, neither CIA nor FBI witnesses were able to identify definitely the extent of Saudi support for terrorist activity globally or within the United States and the extent to which such support, if it exists, is knowing or inadvertent in nature.”

The documents go on to explain that the magnitude of Saudi involvement isn’t clear because the US government only began to “aggressively investigate” after the attack already occurred.

However, it does list prominent Saudis suspected of being involved with terrorism by US intelligence agencies.

Suspected Saudi intelligence officer Omar al-Bayoumi is given a detailed summary in the report. The report starts that FBI files indicate that al-Bayoumi provided “substantial assistance” to 9/11 hijackers Khalid al-Midhar and Nawaf al-Hazmi, two of the five terrorists who crashed American Airlines Flight 77 into the Pentagon.

In February 2000, al-Bayoumi met with hijackers in a public place in San Diego “shortly after his meeting with an individual at the Saudi consulate.”

The report goes on to state that there is reason to believe that al-Bayoumi’s meeting with the terrorists was not accidental. He had “extensive contact” with Saudi government establishments in the US during the same time as the meeting with the hijackers, and received financial support from a Saudi company affiliated with the Saudi Ministry of Defense.

“According to FBI files … al-Bayoumi received a monthly salary [from the company] even though he had had only been there on one occasion,” the report says. “The support increased substantially in April 2000, two months after the hijackers arrived in San Diego, decreased slightly in December 2000, and stayed at that same level until August 2001. That company reportedly had ties to Osama bin Laden and Al-Qaeda.”

Also implicated in the report is a US-based corporation, and, by association, Bandar bin Sultan, a member of the House of Saud who served as Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US from 1983 to 2005.

The report linked Abu Zubaida, a senior Al-Qaeda operative captured in 2002, to certain numbers in the United States by going through his phonebook. One of those numbers is subscribed to by Aspen-based ASPCOL Corporation, a company that was managed the affairs of Ambassador bin Sultan, even though the phone number was unlisted.

Saudi Arabia, an ally to the US in the Middle East, has firmly denied any involvement in the attacks and these repudiated these accusations, and had previously fought against the declassification of the 28 pages.

Just in April Riyadh threatened the US with economic fallout if Congress passed a bill that would allow the Saudi government to be held responsible based on findings from Friday’s report.

Adel al-Jubeir, the Saudi foreign minister, personally told US lawmakers that Saudi Arabia would be forced to sell up to $750 billion in treasury securities and other assets in the United States if the 9/11 bill passes, since they would be worried that the assets could be frozen in American courts.

This tune changed with Friday’s release of the documents, with the Riyadh officially welcoming the report, in hopes that it would remove suspicions about the Saudi government’s actions.

"Since 2002, the 9/11 Commission and several government agencies, including the CIA and the FBI, have investigated the contents of the '28 Pages' and have confirmed that neither the Saudi government, nor senior Saudi officials, nor any person acting on behalf of the Saudi government provided any support or encouragement for these attacks," Abdullah al-Saud, Saudi Arabia's ambassador to the United States, said in a statement, according to Reuters.

"We hope the release of these pages will clear up, once and for all, any lingering questions or suspicions about Saudi Arabia's actions, intentions, or long-term friendship with the United States."