Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Cosmic Disclosure: Empaths and Extraterrestrials with Clifford Stone

Season 5, Episode 13

David Wilcock: Hi, I'm David Wilcock, and you're watching “Cosmic Disclosure”. I'm here with my co-host, Corey Goode, as we go down the rabbit hole.

Clifford Stone never rose above the rank of sergeant while he served in the military. That's an important point. But he was noticed by higher-ups in the military from the time he was a young boy, because of his empathic abilities, or, as he puts it, his ability to telepathically “interface” with the extraterrestrials.

When the military encountered extraterrestrial life forms, they entrusted Clifford to help with communication and facilitation with these entities. It turns out that there are many life forms and extraterrestrial species, just as Corey has been describing on our show.

Life in this universe is much more robust than we have been led to believe. Stone individually corroborates this notion.

So, ladies and gentlemen, without further ado, I give you Clifford Stone.


1 Clifford Stone

Clifford Stone: When I graduated in . . . it was first part of June, 1968, I got a notice from the draft board. And the draft board was telling me, “Greetings and salutations from your friends and neighbors. We need you to report for reconsideration at the Ashland, Kentucky, AFEES, Armed Forces Entrance Examination Station.”

2 Draft Notice

And my mom was upset, says, “No”, you know. “I know you're going to get in the military, and you're going to wind up going to Vietnam.”

I said, “Mom, you don't have to worry about that. I'm medically disqualified. And it's still going to be the same.”

So I went there, and I passed all my written tests, you know, with flying colors, but I still had the medical problem.

There was a captain there that was the medical doctor, and he'd already told me. He says, “Well, you know you're going home.” He says, “I know that you'd like to go ahead and serve your country, but there's nothing we can do. You have medical issues, and you're not qualified for military service.”

We had this colonel who was visiting from the Washington DC, area – I'm going to put it that way – who went ahead and told the captain, “Look, go ahead -” and it was on Friday, and it was Fourth of July weekend - “take your family, go on home, and enjoy the Fourth of July weekend. I'll go ahead and finish up the ones here.”

Well, I was saved till last. Then he called me in, and he said, “You know, you have medical problems.”

I says, “Yes, sir.”

And he says, “Do you really want to go in?”

And I says, “Well, yes, sir. There's a lot of people that don't believe in this war. There's a lot of people that don't want to go. And I want to serve my country. And if I get to go, that's one less person that's going to have to go in my place.”

I said, “Right now, I feel every time somebody that doesn't want to go ends up going, that's a person going in my place. And if I hear that they get killed, then they got killed in my stead.”

And he says, “Well, what if I fix it to where you get to go? You can go ahead and fight it at any time. All you have to do is go and tell them that you have this medical issue.”

And I said, “You get me in, I won't fight it.”

He says, “Well, remember, you got 179 days, once you're in. After you hit that 180 days, you're locked in. They're recognize the medical problems, but you're still in the service.”

I went ahead. I got in. I hit up on staying in. I passed the 180 days, then I went to Fort Jackson, South Carolina.

3 US Army Training Center

When I got to Fort Jackson, South Carolina, that was for my AIT. That's Advanced Individual Training, and I was going to be a clerk typist. Not the dream of my life, because I wanted to be a helicopter pilot, but that wasn't about to come to pass because of the medical situation.

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