Monday, August 29, 2016

JFK Assassination Update - New Deathbed Confession Made By Ex-Government Agent to Oliver Stone

EXCLUSIVE - 'JFK assassination was an inside job': Ex-government agent claimed 'someone from his team' killed the president in remarkable deathbed confession to director Oliver Stone

  • An ex-presidential guard contacted Oliver Stone, who directed JFK biopic
  • He claimed 'somebody from his team' assassinated the president in 1963
  • Stone said he was convinced by his 'military jargon' and intricate details
  • Lee Harvey Oswald was accused of shooting JFK from a nearby building

By Dalya Alberge For Mailonline

Published: 16:40 EST, 28 August 2016 | Updated: 17:56 EST, 28 August 2016

The assassination of John F Kennedy in 1963 was an inside job, according to a deathbed confession given to the veteran film director Oliver Stone.

After making his acclaimed film JFK - which was sympathetic to conspiracy theories about the murder - Stone was contacted by a man claiming to have been a former member of the presidential security team.

Dying of cancer, the man wanted to share a secret that he had until then only told his son – that 'somebody from his own team… had fired on the President'.

He gave only a code name 'Ron', in reaching out through a series of mysterious letters before the two men eventually met.

Stone said he was naturally skeptical about such a claim, as there have been so many conspiracy theories since Kennedy was killed by two rifle bullets while travelling in an open limousine through Dallas in November 1963.

Lee Harvey Oswald was accused of shooting the president from the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository, only to be shot dead himself two days later by a local nightclub owner with connections to the criminal underworld.

Since then there have been question marks over whether Lee Harvey Oswald fired the shots or - if he did it - who was he working for? 

There have also been suggestions that at least one of the fatal shots was fired from a nearby grassy knoll. 
Stone, 69, said his doubts about 'Ron' were dispelled. As a former marine in Vietnam, the film-maker was convinced by the 'military jargon' and intricate details within an account that he describes as 'plausible' and 'very authentic'.

He decided to reveal the man's confession for the first time to Matt Zoller Seitz, who is the author of a forthcoming book on Stone, the Oscar–winning screenwriter and director whose classics include Platoon, about the trauma of the Vietnam War.

Asked why Stone waited until now, Seitz says: 'I think it was because he trusted me, and also because both the father and the son have been dead for a while.

'Nobody has ever heard this story. I'm the first person.'

Stone's co-operated with the book by making himself available for interview giving Seitz free access to his extensive archive without any editorial control.