Saturday, April 16, 2016

CLAIM: Cell towers across the USA are broadcasting brain resonance frequencies to disrupt human minds, says former DARPA scientist

RF radiation

(NaturalNews) A former DARPA scientist who held a top security clearance has warned that transmissions from cell phone towers constitute a "terrorist act" against the civilian population.

Dr. Paul Batcho holds a PhD from Princeton University, and spent nearly three years working for DARPA at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in the field of computational physics.

DARPA is the branch of the Department of Defense responsible for studying emergent military technologies.

While some of Batcho's claims are certainly controversial, his insistence that civilians are being harmed by cell phone towers is likely to be true. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies cell phone tower radiation as a "probable carcinogen."

'Terrorist act'

Batcho has sent numerous letters to federal security agencies, including DARPA and the Department of Homeland Security, claiming that he has identified a "terrorist" threat from cellular towers "in central Florida, and Tampa St Petersburg."

"I seem to have stumbled across an advanced technology that I would classify as synthetic telepathy," he wrote in one such missive. "It clearly uses the cellular towers to transmit illegal signals. It sounds unbelievable but it is actual technology being used on civilians of the US.

"My basic research does indicate that such technology can exist and dates back to the V2K (P300) mind wave technology of the 1970s. This does appear to be a much more advanced version that allows open communication of human mind to mind bridges."

According to Batcho, the internal radiofrequency (RF) generated by the electrical impulses of the human brain is 450 MHz, and this is why Ham radio operators are not allowed to transmit between 400 and 700MHz. Although he says that cellular phones transmit at 853 MHz, he still calls for the installation of filters to prevent phones and towers from transmitting in the 400 to 700 MHz range.

"The verified measurement and existence of these RF band transmissions constitutes a terrorist act," he writes.

"These transmissions will cause harmful health affects in the form of enhanced microwave radiation illness," he continues. "It is imperative that these frequency bands be measured and verified by an official source. These frequency bands do not exist naturally, and there is a technology targeting individuals."

Major research gap

In the emails released to the public, Batcho makes only a single mention of telepathy, mostly emphasizing instead his concern over the health risks of RF transmissions. And while the specifics of his concerns may be controversial, there is indeed an ongoing scientific debate about the health impacts of RF radiation from cell phone towers.

Unlike ionizing radiation, RF radiation is typically too low energy to cause direct damage to cells or DNA – except at very high levels found close to high-powered equipment like long-distance transmitters. That's why U.S. regulatory agencies have typically assumed that the RF radiation from cell phone towers is harmless.

But the International Agency for Research on Cancer disagrees. That's because cell phone towers emit the same type of radiation as cell phones, and a growing body of evidence is linking the latter to cancer, nerve tumors, and a variety of other health risks. It is this research that has led many European governments and institutions to try to limit children's exposure to RF radiation from cell phones and WiFi.

The RF radiation from cell phone towers is 100 times weaker than that from cell phones, but is scattered much closer to the ground. Because very few studies have been conducted on the health effects of these towers, it is impossible to know what the risks really are.

Batcho, at least, thinks he knows.

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